IGP – come out with “safe JB”, “safe KL”, “safe PJ’, “safe Penang”, “safe Ipoh” policing action plans


While the increased police visibility in Johor Baru is greatly welcomed and has brought relief to the long-suffering people of JB who had suffered for years from the runaway crime and lawlessness problem, the police and government should realize that this is only a short-term measure and can be no substitute for a sustained and long-term strategy to make the southern capital a “safe JB”.

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I call on the Inspector-General of Police, Tan Sri Musa Hassan to announce a concrete national policing action plan with a time-line to transform the crime “black areas” in the country into “Safe JB”, “safe KL”, “safe PJ”, “safe Penang”, “safe Ipoh” to restore the confidence of Malaysians, visitors and investors that the police has regained control of the crime problem.

The crime situation is no more just about the fundamental right of Malaysians to feel safe in their own country, whether in the streets, public places or the privacy of their homes, but will affect the country’s economic development and prosperity.

This is because police control of the crime situation has become a negative factor for Malaysia’s competitiveness, turning away FDIs and tourists.

Crime and the lack of physical safety is one of the six factors cited by the European Commission Ambassador, Thierry Rommel, in his controversial speech on Thursday for dampening Malaysia’s investment climate and a reason for the decline in FDIs to Malaysia.

Yesterday, the New Sunday Times reported a roundtable discussion in Putrajaya to explore Malaysia’s potential as an international property destination, and even at such a discussion, the police loss of control of the crime situation became a major issue.

This is what one participant at this roundtable said:

“The perception is that the post-crime delivery system has failed in Malaysia.

“A few days ago in Melbourne, a city larger than Kuala Lumpur, a gunman shot three people. Within 20 minutes the policemen were there; within 10 minutes an ambulance arrived to take the injured to hospital.

“The police cordoned off the area and advised the people not to leave their offices. All of these were done within 45 minutes of the crime.

“This is the delivery system that is lacking in Malaysia.”

This is an illustration that the crime situation is no more a police problem but concerns the quality of life and economic well-being of Malaysian citizens as well as the economic prosperity and future of the country.

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  1. #1 by Godfather on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 1:19 pm

    Action plan ? You gotta be kidding. You’re asking for further destruction of our forests through the waste of good pulp and paper.

    Do all of us a favour. Ask for an Inaction Plan. Maybe they will understand this better.

  2. #2 by dawsheng on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 2:07 pm

    I think it should be “save JB” insted of “safe JB”.

  3. #3 by Cinapek on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 2:15 pm

    The deteriorating crime situation in the country is only the symtom and not the cause.

    The police’s actions, or the lack of it, exacerbated the worsening situation. One has to step back and ask the question why is the crime situation on the rise. For once the IGP said something sensible in yesterday’s papers when he asked for NGO’s and relevant authorities to investigate and analyse why there seems to be a higher tendency towards crime nowadays.

    A well placed senior police officer commented that the majority of crimes such as snatch thefts in JB were committed by youths from out of state. These youths migrated to JB because their home states lack economic opportunities. But after arriving in JB they also had a hard time making ends meet and, lacking the support of a family unit, it was not difficult for them to drift into crime.

    The other category of youths prone to crime were the displaced youths from the plantation estates. Many of these young people are without ICs even though they were born and bred in this country. Without ICs they could not find proper jobs. As their homes in the estates made way for housing estates, these displaced, stateless and jobless youths resorted to crime to survive.

    The final category are the illegal immigrants. Because of its close proximity to Indonesia, the long Johor coastline is like a magnet attracting the illegal immigrants. One often reads of bodies of illegal immigrants washing ashore in Johor from those that failed to make it. For everyone that fails, thousands succeeded. Again most of these illegals are not able to find regular jobs and so resort to crime to survive. The more enterprising amongst them now treats Malaysia as a scavenging ground to hit, grab and return to Indonesia.

    The key to tackle the rising crime problem must be a comprehensive solution to address the social problems facing the migrant youth population and the displaced estate youths. If this can be brought under control, a great deal of the snatch thefts and robberies will be reduced. As for the illegal immigrant problem, we need the political will to resolve this. We have allowed ourselves to be bullied and threatened by our larger neighbour to close an eye to this menace. We should handle them the way Singapore did. Even though they are nearer to Indonesia, they do not have a problem with illegals. Why? Deal with them firmly and no nonsense including caning. The illegals know it and avoid Singapore.

  4. #4 by dawsheng on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 2:38 pm

    “These youths migrated to JB because their home states lack economic opportunities. But after arriving in JB they also had a hard time making ends meet and, lacking the support of a family unit, it was not difficult for them to drift into crime.” Cinapek

    Because of these crimes, the main source of revenues which is the tourist dollar, especially from Singapore dropped significantly, not to mention the attitudes of custom officers and police officers here that misused their authority which made Singaporeans felt unwelcome already. Retail businesses are suffering which resulted in many closed down or half filled shopping centres and offices. Who is going to employ and give opportunity to these youths? A thriving SME can be one of the key to solve this youth problems. What will or can the govt do about it? The BN govt not only irresponsible for not curbing rising violent crimes, they have also neglected the well-being and future of young Malaysians.

  5. #5 by k1980 on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 2:43 pm

    Since the local police is incapable of providing security in JB, Gurkhas should be recruited to beef up security as Singapore is doing

    http://www.hvk.org/articles/0704/120.html
    “These days, Nepalese not Singaporeans guard some of the city’s most sensitive sites. …It is the absence of political or religious roots in Singapore that has granted the soldiers a reputation of utmost objectivity — key to success in Singapore which is inhabited by ethnic Chinese, Malay and Indian communities…”

  6. #6 by shaolin on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 3:36 pm

    Runaway Crimes & Lawlessness in JB Has No Ends,
    Fire-Fighting Measures by Police Deployment Is Just INTERIME;
    What CITIZENS want Is LONG TERM PLAN,
    To The Outcry of Polis’s FAILURE To Guard The Country WELL!!

    We Want To See All Cities To Enjoy PEACE & ORDER,
    NOT To See KILLINGS, RAPES And ADDICTS Any More..;
    IF The Government Thinks It Has Succeeded In The WAR of CRIMES,
    Then CITIZENS Will FOREVER Be Haunted By Its STUPID & IGNORANT Acts!!

  7. #7 by sotong on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 3:55 pm

    These are strong signs of decades failed leadership and bad governance.

    The people are beginning to pay a painful and heavy price of complacency and gross neglect by the country leader/s.

  8. #8 by Utopia on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 4:49 pm

    BN Version!!!

    “The perception is that the post-crime delivery system has failed in Melbourne.

    ”A few days ago in JB, a city smaller than Melbourne, a gang robbed and gang-raped a couple. Within 2 seconds the policemen that passed by there ran away; within 10 minutes noone came, including the coward police that ran off.

    ”The police refuse to take the couple’s crime report and advised the people not to make future crime reports as it will damage their crime reduction percentage! All of these were done within few daysof the crime.

    ”This is the delivery system that is lacking in Melbourne.”

  9. #9 by dawsheng on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 5:20 pm

    “Again most of these illegals are not able to find regular jobs and so resort to crime to survive. The more enterprising amongst them now treats Malaysia as a scavenging ground to hit, grab and return to Indonesia.” Cinapek

    I won’t be surprise if some of those enterprising one carry a Malaysian red IC. BN govt has done Malaysians a lot of wrong, the biggest was letting illegal immigrants becoming a national threats to its own citizens, this also signal that their policy of importing more voters from our neighbour to support its poltical agenda is now out of control, and to tackle and rooted out the problem may trigger an illegal immigrants crisis and open up can of worms. That’s why nothing much can be done to help the situation.

  10. #10 by Loh on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 6:04 pm

    ///This is an illustration that the crime situation is no more a police problem but concerns the quality of life and economic well-being of Malaysian citizens as well as the economic prosperity and future of the country.///

    The crime situation in 1969 and before was never as bad as it is today. The police should have the figure on police force assigned to crimes prevention and crimes suppression per thousand population. Has the ratio declined, which has caused the higher crime rates? Or has it remained the same or higher, and yet crime rates cannot re reduced?

    The primary responsibility of any modern government is to ensure peace and security for its people who in turn have the duties to pay taxes and be law abiding. With conducive environment, the qualify of life and economic well being of the people should improve over time. But the high crime rates and the high costs of living when the lowest rung of the civil servants needed to moonlight to make ends meet show that the government has failed to meet the primary responsibility expected of a modern government. The results show that the government which has been ruling for the past 50 years without interruption has regressed, and would not be able to catch up with the changing world. Yet the same government will be returned to power again come next election. Are the citizens minus the UMNOputras that unlucky that we deserve the BN government? Do the Malays, the 60% of the total Malaysians prefer the policies so decided by UMNOputras that by 2057, this multiracial country would be purified to the extent that non-muslims would account for less than 10%, like Indonesia or Pakistan.The majority would decide the fate of the minority, who has no choice about the matter.

  11. #11 by i_love_malaysia on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 7:13 pm

    Actually, we dont need European Commission Ambassador, Thierry Rommel to tell us what Malaysia whom I love is degenerated into now, but it carries more weight when these words came out from the mouth of a person who are in such a high position will definitely making the bell ring louder and longer!!! I hope and I pray that more such high ranking people from within and from outside will speak out without fear or favour for the good of our beloved country Malaysia!!! Making Malaysia the best place to live on earth!!! GOD Bless Malaysia!!!

  12. #12 by undergrad2 on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 9:34 pm

    “….to the extent that non-muslims would account for less than 10%, like Indonesia or Pakistan.The majority would decide the fate of the minority, who has no choice about the matter.”

    Some people call this ‘democracy’ – for whatever good the government of the people, by the people and for the people may hold for us, it has its weaknesses. One of those is the tendency for a young democracy to develop into a variant some refer to as the tyranny of the majority over the minority.

    Indonesia’s Chinese make up less than 2% of the total population of some 200 million and they have suffered from persecution – religious, political and economic. Millions live abroad albeit working illegally to earn a living. But many more prefer not to live in exile, preferring to live in a country which offers them business opportunities not available elsewhere.

  13. #13 by japankiller on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 9:48 pm

    For malaysia case, 45 min they are still hanging on the phone, the best way to find the police on the street is go to mamak stall and u will easily get one.

  14. #14 by k1980 on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 9:50 pm

    Malaysia’s own fairy tale that beats Snow White, Cinderella and the Sleeping Beauty combined
    http://malaysia-today.net/blog2006/corridors.php?itemid=5531

    Malaysia’s Holy Trinity; the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost — the Father being Abdullah, the Son Kamal, and certainly the Holy Ghost none other than Khairy….There was one who tried her damnest to snare the top man who walks in the corridors of power but Abdullah was given a stern warning by her ex-step-son-in-law that it would spell doom for him if he allowed her to get her tentacles on him….She would have consumed Abdullah for breakfast and spit him out by lunchtime.

    …this was a case where the pilot was absent and the cabin crew were flying the aircraft. Can you imagine the stewards and stewardesses in charge of the flight while the pilot is God knows where? Sure, we do have a co-pilot, but the co-pilot too has his hands full sorting out various matters — not quite matters of state but crisis galore brought about by his difficulty in keeping his hormones in check. Phew, talk about the lunatics running the asylum….You can’t just delegate to immediate members of your family the task of charting the future of 26 million Malaysians. But this is what Malaysia had been reduced to.

  15. #15 by democratic junkie on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 10:18 pm

    kl1980,

    this is a political issue. the police force provides jobs for unemployable malays as well as enforcement power in times of emergency. its their last line of “defence”. They arent going to let objectivity come into the picture. In case another may 13th happens, malay hegemony can be protected…..by malay police and soldiers.

    They are afraid gurkha guards might carry out a coup and form goverment…..=)

  16. #16 by negarawan on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 10:43 pm

    Well until the police themselves become law abiding citizens, don’t put too much hope in them

  17. #17 by undergrad2 on Monday, 25 June 2007 - 11:42 pm

    “Malaysia’s Holy Trinity; the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost — the Father being Abdullah, the Son Kamal, and certainly the Holy Ghost none other than Khairy….”

    This is blasphemy no matter how you spin it!

  18. #18 by k1980 on Tuesday, 26 June 2007 - 9:49 am

    http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/06/24/europe/hkpolice.php
    …The popularity of the Hong Kong police is a big achievement for a force that until the mid-1970s was regarded as one of the most corrupt in Asia. …Shock therapy was applied by the colonial government with the formation of the Independent Commission Against Corruption in 1974, and dozens of police officers were prosecuted or dismissed. The crackdown helped turn the Hong Kong Police Force into one of the world’s cleanest. Complaints against the police continue to fall; allegations of misconduct made to the Independent Police Complaints Council are down by almost half since 2001.

    Tang said Hong Kong’s success reflected efforts to instill a service mentality and improve professionalism. Dial 999 for help, he said, and the police will usually arrive at the scene within three minutes. He is also a strong believer in the longstanding policy of putting uniformed police officers on foot patrol.

  19. #19 by ENDANGERED HORNBILL on Tuesday, 26 June 2007 - 10:12 am

    IGP Musa must either take legal action and sue ‘Malaysia Today’ for slander or be damned by his inaction. More often than not, the guilty would just remain silent and wish the ill winds away. Musa, not this time and not when there are blogs around.

    Read from BERNAMA:

    “There are so many websites nowadays. Everybody can write what they want… globalisation… so let them (the people) evaluate,” he told reporters when asked to comment on a report posted on the “Malaysia Today” blogsite which alleged that Musa was involved in corruption and had been influenced by heads of crime syndicates in deciding on the positions of senior police officers.

    Musa declined to elaborate on the matter, saying that such wild allegations would not jeopardise his responsibilities as the chief of police.

    “I don’t want to talk… because they (allegations) are false and I’m not at all bothered by them because my genuine intention is only to improve the (police) force and ensure that all police officers and men discharge their duties well,” he said.

  20. #20 by shaolin on Tuesday, 26 June 2007 - 11:02 am

    Increased Visibility of Police presence is just Fire-Fighting Measures! We want More Solid And Promising Long Term Action Plans to be deployed in All Cities thrughout Malaysia!! Still we think we need to re-post this message to all our Beloved Citizens:

    IGP And His Police Officers’s Uniforms May Look Smart,
    However Their Heads Are Full of Cow Dung!

    Look At JB, A City of All EVILS,
    Brutal Killings Cum Gang Rapes Are Everywhere!!

    Look At Singapore, A City of PRAISE;
    Don’t We Feel ASHAME of Ourselves, The BODOHLand??

    One May Ask WHAT’s the Function Of Police Force?
    To Protect And Provide SECURITY To CITIZENS Is The Answer!

    We Don’t Need Policemen To Be ONLY ADMINISTRATORS’
    And be SLEEPING In The Polis Stations All Day Long!!

    Wake UP POLICEMEN, Wake Up;
    Your Duty Is To GUARD, NOT To Sleeeeep;

    When Come to CRIME ANALYSIS, Their Brains Score ZERO,
    When Come to CORRUPTION, Their Grey Matters Score HUNDRED!!

  21. #21 by juarezfong on Tuesday, 26 June 2007 - 1:01 pm

    Will the police ever success in reducing the crime rate in the major cities? Malaysia towards vision 2020??? Malaysia negara maju? Malaysia Boleh? I hope we can achieve all these vision…but with the current situation….we are no better than the trouble thailand, the corrupted indonesia nor the political instability philiphines! Wake up! or we will be left even further! please…wake up! don’t keep on telling the “rakyat” we are improving! improving in such a pace and way is totally unacceptable!

  22. #22 by IMMalaysian on Tuesday, 26 June 2007 - 10:06 pm

    if someone still can remember about Lee Kwan Yew’s afidavit years ago on JB’s crime rate, we can see that Singapore leaders have more farsight than Malaysian’s leaders. Mr. Lee already given us hints about deteriorating crimes situation but no one was taking heed except certain group of people came out picketing and calling him ‘kurang ajar’. So now we have to eat the humble pie and face the music by refusing to acknowledge the real situation.

  23. #23 by undergrad2 on Tuesday, 26 June 2007 - 11:20 pm

    “I don’t want to talk… because they (allegations) are false and I’m not at all bothered by them because my genuine intention is only to improve the (police) force and ensure that all police officers and men discharge their duties well,” IGP Musa said.” HORNBILL

    Isn’t this a familiar position to take for those who have a guilty mind and are guilty of the allegations and have more to lose should he sue the party making the allegations?

    Who says there shouldn’t be trial be media??

  24. #24 by Count Dracula on Wednesday, 27 June 2007 - 5:14 am

    Let us have a trial by media for Razak Baginda and his errand boys.

  25. #25 by DiaperHead on Wednesday, 27 June 2007 - 6:32 am

    Is it too late to have him charged under the Internal Security Act (ISA)? This chap is a security risk. He knows too much.

  26. #26 by ktteokt on Saturday, 30 June 2007 - 10:32 am

    The day the IGP of Malaysia put in the headlines of newspapers in Malaysia that “The Police Force is shorthanded” is as good as giving a licence to these criminals to rob an to commit crimes. How can the head of police make such an irresponsible statement in the press. This not only encourages criminals to be more active, but it also served as a threat to the general public who depend on the police for public security.

    Making such a statement tantamounts to “The police are shorthanded and cannot catch you criminals, so go ahead and commit all the crimes you like”. This would have been the implication of this statement and it is because of this that the recent crime rate has soared.

    Since Malaysia is such a “primitive” country which depend on primitive laws such as the Official Secrets Act, shouldn’t the shortage of manpower in the police force be classified as official secret? Then why is the chief of police making such a silly statement? So shouldn’t the police chief be charged under the OSA?

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